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Had an "odd" idea from this thread, but because I'm curious, I don't suppose Imperial America could develop something of an "American" language descended from English?

Because personally, I don't think the influx of lots of foreign vocabulary will be the only significant change, as I imagine the language itself will come to accommodate the absorption of foreign peoples and colonial subjects who may struggle with its inconsistent grammar and orthographic rules. (e.g.: The institution of a standardized spelling system.)
Skallagrim
Skallagrim
The reality (hitorically as well) is that most people could speak a regular (on near enough to regular) form of the common language, and used that when talking to their social superiors. At home, they'd speak their own dialect. It seems quite probable to me that in the future, the West will see many people speaking a gamut of all sorts of languages, with most everyone speaking "Koine English" (to borrow the Greek term) as well. That being a cosmopolitan, "mingled" form of English for the universal era. And the elite will speak a more refined form of this, with deliberately classical, genteel affectations.

Naturally, it would be hilarious if the common, "imperial" English becomes known as "American", and the elite variety being "High American". Fanciful, of course -- but a fun idea.
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Zyobot
Zyobot
Hmm, fascinating.

Hopefully, future historians, archaeologists, and other experts will have more access to the writings and language of "common people" from the "Occidental Age" than we do for the average Greek or Roman who lived during Antiquity. I know you don't think inordinately much from our period will be preserved or well-remembered, but considering that literacy is universal, I imagine that finding diaries or letters written by your garden-variety Westerner will be easier to come across, finicky digital preservation notwithstanding. (And that's the key issue here, it seems.)
Zyobot
Zyobot
Anyway, be interesting to have future English (or perhaps, "American") acquire a register or two, with the universal variant as "Standard American" and an upper-crust variant as "High American", similar to what you've said. (Though, I also expect many regional "American" dialects to develop, in addition to communities still retaining altogether different native languages.) That's already the case with Arabic, I believe, so if we're looking for modern-day parallels to future linguistic developments, that could be an indicator, too.
Actually, since you wrote a TL on his victory, I don't suppose you have any book recommendations on Thomas Dewey?

I don't much about him, but he strikes me as an interesting guy, especially given the contrast between OTL and what a "special" president he is in IYTL. (Any recommendations you might have for the Fifties in general would also be appreciated, if you're so inclined.)
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Circle of Willis
Circle of Willis
Aside from the sources you can find at the bottom of Dewey's Wikipedia page (biographies and such), I would definitely have to recommend the November 1948 issue of Kiplinger's Personal Finance, which extensively discusses everything Dewey up to & including how he's likely to behave as President based on both his campaign rhetoric/platform and actual record in government up to that point - as you can see from the link, pages 10-32 are taken up by a section literally titled 'What Dewey Will Do'. This was, naturally, my main source for Dewey's run in DDT.

There's a little bit in the page 350-360 range (can't remember the exact numbers) in J. Edgar Hoover: The Man and the Secrets by Curt Gentry that you may find interesting re: Dewey, as well. It was my source for why Hoover ends up becoming AG, then Chief Justice in DDT.
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Zyobot
Zyobot
Thanks, bro. Not a history major, but honestly, there are times when I feel like I missed out on a career I might've really enjoyed. :unsure:

Anyway, I don't suppose you've seen this C-SPAN Booknotes interview where Simon Montefiore discusses Stalin: Court of the Red Tsar? I haven't had the chance to read it myself yet, but judging by Montefiore's well-researched elucidation and evident passion for his craft, it's definitely something to add to my reading list. (I've also been looking to write an ASB story featuring lots of Greeks and Romans, as well, and there's little doubt in mind that—lack of charisma and military prowess notwithstanding—Stalin would've made a damn formidable power player in that environment.)
Out of curiosity, I don’t suppose you have some “ideas” about what we can expect from the rest of the 21st century?

For one, you strike me as a great deal less cynical than @Skallagrim, despite being more or less agreement that America will be Rome Reborn.
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Zyobot
Zyobot
I'm aware of that, yes.

However, I'm guessing by "conservative", you're probably referring to something that fuses the more localist and class-conscious governments of ages past with good ol' Classical Liberalism, especially since America will probably be at the head of the pendulum swing? (Personally, I'd be down with a return to the Old Republic and a more libertarian-esque approach to governance, similar to what someone like Ron Paul advocates for. But in any case, I don't expect the "transition period" between now and then to be... easy, let's say.)
Lord Sovereign
Lord Sovereign
I don't pretend to have a perfect prediction of the future, only something more along the lines of "leanings." I've little doubt America will embrace its constitutional heritage again alongside some tighter immigration laws (essentially what you've described). Although, one thing I think will be common among all post progressive paradigm countries is a semi-paranoia over leftism. It wouldn't entirely be unsimilar from what most modern Eastern European countries think of communism.
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Zyobot
Zyobot
Perhaps that's for the best. Granted, I think there are a few things worth salvaging, such as modern technology and a healthy regard for human rights, which I believe a more constitutionally-inclined America probably will retain.

As you say, there's no way to pinpoint what's to come exactly, though I once cooked up a more "impressionistic" scenario elsewhere, in which I "color within the lines" of @Skallagrim's macro-historical outlook by predicting a demonic Neo-Caesar who's basically a fusion of Thanos and Emperor Palpatine, followed by 1776 roaring back to life and bringing a kind, humble Luke Skywalker-as-Neo-Augustus to the forefront. (Under his rule, the central government is practically toothless, leaving conquests abroad to explorers, homesteaders, and business interests who engage in "privatized" imperialism that meshes Britain's trade-centric approach with the Wild West-style bonanza of 19th century America.)
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