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Immigration and multiculturalism news

Floridaman

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How about simply using IQ testing, then? Anyone with a certain IQ or above is eligible to immigrate over here, regardless of their country of origin?
Iq isn’t really a guarantee for success, there are people with genius level iqs who live off welfare, and those who test poorly who have done great things... second there is the matter of chain immigration, under the rules it is easy to bring relatives so one genius could bring an extended family even if they don’t meet the standards..... also it doesn’t enable us to deal with what happens when we get too many at once.
 

WolfBear

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The only problem with selective immigration from nations with much lower IQ is that the talented and skilled migrant from the lower IQ country that could immigrate to a richer country would contribute to the brain drain of the country the prospective immigrant would come from. While it is also reasonable for people to flee from unstable countries to richer ones, the richer nations should also find the source of the problems the unstable countries are facing, and solve it so that the affected nations could improve long enough to develop it and lessen the desires for emigration from the unstable country.

I'm actually quite opposed to open borders myself, if only because it undermines the concept of what a border is like. Other than that, controlled immigration could also be beneficial in that you'd acquire the talent pool of the affected country and adopt it as your own, but you'd also have tensions between migrants and the natives that inhabit the country. Which is exactly why there's a large tension between the migrants and native Europeans in the European continent.
Yeah, it's quite interesting: Talented and skilled migrants might be more productive in developed countries in certain cases; for instance, the Syrian doctor who diagnosed this woman:



But it can also be counterproductive if a talented and skilled migrants leaves a highly useful profession for a much less useful one. For instance, a Tanzanian doctor becoming an Uber driver here in the West. Of course, a libertarian could argue that this justifies government coercion in regards to one's occupational choice, but this strikes me as being less likely since a doctor would still earn more money in Tanzania than, say, a painter would, hence increasing the incentive for people in Tanzania to be doctors rather than painters if they actually had the abilities for this.
 

WolfBear

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Iq isn’t really a guarantee for success, there are people with genius level iqs who live off welfare, and those who test poorly who have done great things... second there is the matter of chain immigration, under the rules it is easy to bring relatives so one genius could bring an extended family even if they don’t meet the standards..... also it doesn’t enable us to deal with what happens when we get too many at once.
You could curb chain migration and IQ is the best predictor of this that we have but, as you said, it's imperfect. There are many people who don't fit the general trends for their IQ group even if the general trends themselves are clear. And Yes, total numbers can be important, though Canada appears to be doing a good job of accepting huge numbers of immigrants at once.
 

WolfBear

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Let's imagine immigration and brain drain, shall we? My own parents could have stayed in Russia instead of moving to Israel and then to the US. However, would that have actually been a good idea? In such a scenario, my parents, who are both highly educated, would have been funding Vladimir Putin's war machine right now.
 

Floridaman

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You could curb chain migration and IQ is the best predictor of this that we have but, as you said, it's imperfect. There are many people who don't fit the general trends for their IQ group even if the general trends themselves are clear. And Yes, total numbers can be important, though Canada appears to be doing a good job of accepting huge numbers of immigrants at once.
Ehhh I wouldn’t call Canada a success right now, even ignoring the fact that the country has become increasingly authoritarian in recent years, housing has become virtually unattainable for many people in the country not a recipe for domestic stability.
 

WolfBear

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Ehhh I wouldn’t call Canada a success right now, even ignoring the fact that the country has become increasingly authoritarian in recent years, housing has become virtually unattainable for many people in the country not a recipe for domestic stability.
Then build more housing!


 

TheRomanSlayer

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Let's imagine immigration and brain drain, shall we? My own parents could have stayed in Russia instead of moving to Israel and then to the US. However, would that have actually been a good idea? In such a scenario, my parents, who are both highly educated, would have been funding Vladimir Putin's war machine right now.
If there was an incentive for your parents to move to the US or Israel, it may be based on a person to person case basis. I suspect that your parents qualify for the Right to Return to Israel, based on their heritage, right?

In my case though, it wouldn't be that much of a brain drain if my family moved to a place like Canada. While my mother finished university in the Philippines, she worked as a domestic helper before going back to school and upgrading herself. That kind of migration is beneficial to both parties (my mother and the Canadian government).
 

WolfBear

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If there was an incentive for your parents to move to the US or Israel, it may be based on a person to person case basis. I suspect that your parents qualify for the Right to Return to Israel, based on their heritage, right?

In my case though, it wouldn't be that much of a brain drain if my family moved to a place like Canada. While my mother finished university in the Philippines, she worked as a domestic helper before going back to school and upgrading herself. That kind of migration is beneficial to both parties (my mother and the Canadian government).
My dad did since my dad had a Jewish father. My mom qualified by her marriage to him. Interestingly enough, several years later, my mom's brother married a rather dull half-Jewish woman (Jewish on her father's side) and thus was able to immigrate to Israel that way as well. But we subsequently left Israel a couple of years later. My maternal uncle did stay in Israel, though, but he did eventually divorce that woman several years later. They had a son together while they were still married, though.

Did she go back to school in the Philippines or in Canada?
 

TheRomanSlayer

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My dad did since my dad had a Jewish father. My mom qualified by her marriage to him. Interestingly enough, several years later, my mom's brother married a rather dull half-Jewish woman (Jewish on her father's side) and thus was able to immigrate to Israel that way as well. But we subsequently left Israel a couple of years later. My maternal uncle did stay in Israel, though, but he did eventually divorce that woman several years later. They had a son together while they were still married, though.

Did she go back to school in the Philippines or in Canada?
Canada.

Although wouldn't someone be considered as a Jew if they had a Jewish mother?
 

WolfBear

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Although wouldn't someone be considered as a Jew if they had a Jewish mother?
Yes, but the mother's mother also had to be Jewish unless there was a conversion. But Israel's Law of Return doesn't match strictly with halakha and instead allows people who are up to 1/4 Jewish to move there.
 

Marduk

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Disagree, because most Americans would not be capable of getting a STEM PhD regardless of anything that they did, for instance. They'd simply lack the necessary intelligence for it.
I don't have a problem with the US citizenship exam; that exam really is pretty easy to pass if you've studied for it. I'm not complaining about that since both of my parents have already passed it and it wasn't very difficult for them to do after they have sufficiently studied the relevant materials. Rather, my complaint here is about the proposed RAISE Act making it WAY too difficult for people to immigrate to the US since they'd have to be better than 98% of present-day Americans in order for them to ever actually have any chance of getting an immigrant visa. That's extremely unrealistic even for most immigrants from other Western countries!
So? What's the point being made here? That it's hypocrisy unless most can pass, and in turn the standards should be so loose a quarter of the world can move to USA at will?
Why should it be realistic for so many immigrants? If there is no limit, then millions third worlders will come until the job and housing markets are made so miserable that even they will no longer want to come. It's an absolute non-argument.
Reminder that 1% of the world is still something like 80 million people, and if there is one country that can afford to aim for attracting the cream of the crop of world's immigrants it's USA.
 

Captain X

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Honestly, bringing up what other countries do is entirely pointless. Other countries can do whatever they want to do in terms of immigration. I'm actually pretty tempted to just shut it down entirely, but I'll settle for high standards. Not that it matters considering how illegal immigration is being handled.
 

DarthOne

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Soros-Linked Group Wins $172M Contract from Biden to Help Border Crossers Avoid Deportation


A left-wing group linked to billionaire George Soros has won a nearly $172 million federal contract from President Joe Biden’s administration to help young border crossers avoid deportation, a report revealed this week.

Fox News’s Adam Shaw and Joe Schoffstall reported on Thursday that the Vera Institute of Justice, with financial ties to Soros, has won a federal contract for $171.7 million that will provide attorneys to Unaccompanied Alien Children (UACs) to avoid deportation from the United States.

The federal contract could end up showering the Vera Institute of Justice with $1 billion in taxpayer funding, Fox News reported:

The arrangement lasts until March 2023 but can reach as high as $983 million if renewed until March 2027, the agreement shows. This appears to be the largest federal contract Vera has secured for immigration-related services for any single year dating back to the mid-2000s. [Emphasis added]

The Vera Insitute, meanwhile, is propelled by taxpayer-backed government grants and contracts like the one it secured in March. Between July 1, 2020, and June 30, 2021, $152 million of the group’s $191 million in revenue came from government sources, its most recent financial audit shows. [Emphasis added]
The institute seeks to end “mass incarceration” by cutting down on the number of jails, prisons and detention centers in the United States. The group has also signaled support for defunding police. [Emphasis added]
As Breitbart News reported in 2018, the Vera Institute of Justice was previously awarded $310 million by the Obama administration to help UACs avoid deportation.

The group also takes taxpayer money via sanctuary jurisdictions.

In 2019, for instance, the Vera Institute of Justice worked with the city of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, to create a program dedicated to helping illegal aliens avoid deportation specifically by providing them with free legal services.
SOOOOROOOOOS! :mad: :mad:
 

DarthOne

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Californians and Other Americans Are Flooding Mexico City. Some Locals Want Them to Go Home


MEXICO CITY —


Fernando Bustos Gorozpe was sitting with associates in a restaurant right here when he realized that — as soon as once more — they had been outnumbered.

“We’re the only brown people,” mentioned Bustos, a 38-year-old author and college professor. “We’re the only people speaking Spanish except the waiters.”

Mexico has lengthy been the highest international journey vacation spot for Americans, its bountiful seashores and picturesque pueblos luring tens of tens of millions of U.S. guests yearly. But lately, a rising variety of vacationers and distant employees — hailing from Brooklyn, N.Y., Silicon Valley and factors in between — have flooded the nation’s capital and left a scent of new-wave imperialism.

The inflow, which has accelerated because the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic and is probably going to proceed as inflation rises, is remodeling a few of the metropolis’s most treasured neighborhoods into
expat enclaves.

Americans have lengthy been in a position to keep in Mexico up to six months with out a visa. One mentioned Mexico City “reminds me of being in a more friendly, more clean at times, Brooklyn.”

In leafy, walkable quarters resembling Roma, Condesa, Centro and Juarez, rents are hovering as Americans and other foreigners snap up homes and landlords commerce long-term renters for vacationers keen to pay extra on Airbnb. Taquerias, nook shops and fondas — small, family-run lunch spots — are being changed by Pilates studios, co-working areas and glossy cafes promoting oat-milk
lattes and avocado toast.

And English — nicely, it’s in every single place: ringing out at supermarkets, pure wine bars and health lessons within the park.

At Lardo, a Mediterranean restaurant the place, on any given evening, three-quarters of the tables are crammed with foreigners, a Mexican man in a well-cut swimsuit lately took a seat on the bar, gazed on the English-language menu earlier than him and sighed as he handed it again: “A menu in Spanish, please.”

Some chilangos, as locals are recognized, are fed up.

Recently, expletive-laced posters appeared round city.

“New to the city? Working remotely?” they learn in English. “You’re a f—ing plague and the locals f—ing hate you. Leave.”

That sentiment echoed the a whole bunch of responses that poured in after a younger American posted this seemingly innocuous tweet: “Do yourself a favor and remote work in Mexico City — it is truly magical.”

“Please don’t,” learn one of many kinder replies. “This city is becoming more and more expensive every day in part because of people like you, and you don’t even realize or care about it.”

Hugo Van der Merwe, 31 — a online game designer who grew up in Florida and Namibia and has spent the final a number of months working remotely from Mexico City, Montreal and Bogota, Colombia — mentioned he understands why locals are vexed by the rising inhabitants of “digital nomads.”


“There’s a distinction between people who want to learn about the place they are in and those who just like it because it’s cheap,” he mentioned. “I’ve met a number of people who don’t really care that they’re in Mexico, they just care that it’s cheap.”

Clear monetary incentives are drawing Americans to Mexico City — the place the common native wage is $450 a month.

For the price of a $2,000 one-bedroom in Koreatown, an Angeleno can hire a penthouse right here.

Despite rising tensions, Mexico City isn’t Paris, the place an American stumbling over French in a boulangerie will get a dose of hostility alongside together with her croissants. It’s not Berlin or Barcelona, the place locals lately have mounted main protests over extreme tourism and the gobbling up of city properties by world funding corporations.

The overwhelming majority of individuals on this crowded, colourful metropolis are unwaveringly variety and affected person with worldwide guests, who within the first 4 months of this 12 months spent $851 million on inns alone, in accordance to tourism information.

But there’s friction beneath the floor, as extra locals take into account what gentrification means for the town’s economics, tradition and even race relations.

Over the weekend, a tenant advocacy group hosted a strolling tour of “places we have lost to gentrification, touristification and forced displacement.”

“Our homes,” the occasion flier learn, “now house digital nomads.”

The dynamic enjoying out right here is, in some ways, an old-world downside colliding with tech-age mobility, one that’s forcing Mexico to confront its personal historical past and traits.

Fernando Bustos Gorozpe is a philosophy instructor and cultural critic who has been outspoken concerning the penalties the inflow of vacationers and distant employees has had on Mexico City.

After his revelation on the cafe, Bustos uploaded a video to his well-liked TikTok account, complaining that the inflow of foreigners in Mexico City “stinks of modern colonialism.” Nearly 2,000 individuals posted feedback in settlement.

His critique is multilayered and speaks to generations of injustices. There’s the issue of newcomers’ “indifference as to how their actions are affecting locals,” he mentioned, but additionally the truth that Mexicans can not migrate to the U.S. with the identical ease. He additionally believes that Americans, a lot of whom are white, are reinforcing the town’s pervasive — if sometimes mentioned — caste system.

Indigenous Mexicans are extra seemingly to be poor than lighter-skinned Mexicans and are largely unrepresented in movie, tv and ads. A rising social motion known as Poder Prieto (“Brown Power”) has demanded that Netflix, HBO and other streaming platforms feature dark-skinned actors.

“Mexico is classist and racist,” Bustos mentioned. “People with white skin are given preference. Now, if a local wants to go to a restaurant or a club, they don’t just have to compete with rich, white Mexicans but with foreigners too.”

Greater Mexico City’s 3,000 sq. miles are ringed by mountains and home to 21 million individuals. Most Americans stick to a couple of neighborhoods within the heart, a few of which had been first gentrified by Mexicans.

After the 1985 earthquake devastated neighborhoods in and round downtown, middle-class residents fled by the a whole bunch of hundreds to areas on the town’s periphery that they deemed safer.

In Roma and Condesa, artists lured by low cost rents moved in, turning the realm right into a inventive and mental hub.

The flood of American guests started in earnest round 2016, when the New York Times named Mexico City the world’s prime journey vacation spot, and journal writers questioned whether or not it was the “new Berlin.”

International artists, cooks and designers arrived, scooping up cheap studio areas, opening eating places and integrating themselves into the town’s imaginative nightlife.

The pandemic pushed it into overdrive. As a lot of Europe and Asia shut their doorways to Americans in 2020, Mexico, which adopted few COVID-19 restrictions, was one of many few locations the place gringos had been welcome.

Making it simpler: Americans have lengthy been in a position to keep right here up to six months with out a visa.

The State Department says there are 1.6 million U.S. residents residing in Mexico, though it doesn’t know what number of are primarily based within the capital. Mexican census knowledge observe solely foreigners who’ve utilized for residency, and most distant employees don’t.

But the anecdotal proof is compelling. In the primary 4 months of the 12 months, 1.2 million foreigners arrived at Mexico City’s airport. Alexandra Demou, who runs the relocation firm
Welcome Home Mexico, mentioned she will get 50 calls per week from individuals considering a transfer.

“We’re just seeing Americans flooding in,” she mentioned. “It’s people who maybe have their own business, or maybe they’re thinking of starting some consulting or freelance work. They don’t even know how long they’re going to stay. They’re completely picking up their entire lives and just moving down here.”

There is loads to love about Mexico City.

Wide, tree-lined boulevards name to thoughts the capitals of Europe and every Sunday are closed to vehicles and crammed with bicyclists. A hodgepodge of structure — Art Nouveau, Art Deco, Modernist — sew collectively in suave methods.

And the meals is excellent: Street distributors promote spit-grilled al pastor pork tacos, delicate quesadillas full of squash blossoms and stewed corn topped with mayonnaise and lime — typically all on the identical block.

Sarah Lupton, a 35-year-old from North Carolina who got here to Mexico City final 12 months, as quickly as she received her second COVID-19 vaccine, mentioned she fell in love with the “romantic yet gritty” aesthetic. She ended up promoting her video manufacturing firm and relocating right here in January together with her Shih Tzu. Now she’s studying Spanish, making use of for residency and exploring a brand new path as a life and profession coach.

“I came for a new set of possibilities for how I experience my life and what I get to create in it,” she mentioned. “I feel like this city has everything I need to build a life of creativity, connection, adventure and stability.”

Lauren Rodwell, 40, additionally moved down in January after spending a number of months right here final 12 months.

A marketer who works a tech job that’s distant, she was uninterested in residing in San Francisco, the place each dialog started with, “What do you do?”

“I like being in vibrant cities that have multiple cultures that mix well, where there’s good food and good energy and dancing and art,” she mentioned. “It reminds me of being in a more friendly, more clean at times, Brooklyn.”


Lupton and Rodwell each mentioned they are delicate to issues about gentrification. In San Francisco, Rodwell lived within the Mission, a neighborhood that grew to become emblematic of the sweeping change wrought by the tech business there.

“I try and frequent local businesses and not go with the big conglomerates,” mentioned Rodwell. “I try to give money back to my community and be involved in my community.”

Rodwell, who’s Black, mentioned she doesn’t really feel responsible.

“I kind of feel like, as a person of color from America, I’m so economically disadvantaged that wherever I go and experience some advantage or equity, I take it,” she mentioned.

In Mexico, which has a comparatively small inhabitants of Afro-Mexicans and had a shorter historical past of slavery, Rodwell doesn’t expertise the identical racism as she does within the U.S., she mentioned. “Being Black in America,” she mentioned, is exhausting. “It’s nice to take a break from it.”

Much of the criticism within the rising debate about foreigners comes down to financial inequality.

“Americans can come here, and they can afford everything and live like kings and queens,” mentioned Dan Defossey, an American who moved to Mexico a dozen years in the past and owns a preferred barbecue joint. But they want to perceive, he mentioned, that “Mexico is not cheap for Mexicans.”

Omar Euroza, a barista at a espresso store in Roma, mentioned hire for his house within the metropolis’s historic heart, one other place the place foreigners are flocking, has greater than doubled during the last 5 years. Nearby, renters have been pushed out as total buildings are was upscale residences.

A current examine confirmed that Mexico City residents spend a mean of 60% of their revenue on housing, and practically a 3rd of residents moved in the course of the pandemic, the bulk as a result of they couldn’t afford hire.

Euroza mentioned he was sick of feeling like an outsider in his metropolis. Around 60%-70% of his purchasers are foreigners, he mentioned.

“Some people order in English and get mad when I don’t understand them.”

A chef who had simply taken a sheet of heat cookies out of the oven shook his head.

“That’s unfair,” he mentioned. “If we go to the U.S., we’re expected to speak English.”

There is a rising motion to assist newcomers perceive the affect they’re having — resembling a poster marketing campaign that, in the course of the peak of the pandemic, coaxed foreigners to masks up. “Dear guests, we are genuinely happy you’re vaccinated,” the posters learn. “Please consider that many of us are not.”

Some Mexicans aren’t sad concerning the American inundation, like Sandra Hernández, an actual property agent who mentioned all the current offers she has closed have concerned Americans. They principally want homes or residences within the Art Deco type, she mentioned, and are all keen to pay the asking value.

Ted Rossano Jr., whose mother and father twenty years in the past opened a taco stand in Centro, mentioned revenue from foreigners has helped save the enterprise, which suffered in the course of the pandemic. Ricos Tacos Toluca is a cease on a number of of the “taco tours” which have emerged lately, and he mentioned foreigners now provide about 15% of the stand’s income.

“It’s cool. We’re proud of it,” Rossano mentioned. “Who would have thought that a simple business like this would get international recognition?”

On a current afternoon, three Americans and a Brit had been contentedly munching the stand’s well-known inexperienced chorizo tacos as their information, Tyler Hansbrough, defined the chef’s handiwork.

“See, she has to render all that,” he mentioned, as Rossano’s mother moved chorizo round a griddle.

Hansbrough taught Spanish at a San Francisco highschool earlier than transferring right here in 2016. He married a Mexican man and opened Tyler’s Taco Tours to present guests genuine Mexican meals — not the upscale stuff they could discover in eating places in Roma or Condesa.

He has been struck by the variety of distant employees flooding in and worries that they are totally different. The nature of their jobs means they don’t essentially have to study Spanish or combine into Mexican society, he mentioned. It permits a sure aloofness that wasn’t potential a couple of years in the past.

“So many people come here and think, ‘Oh, Mexico City is so cheap. I could move here.’ And they are. They’re renting my Airbnb for months at a time,” he mentioned. “But I’m starting to be worried. It’s great for business, but it’s also kind of scaring me.”

As his group completed the tacos and ventured into the cacophonous metropolis for his or her subsequent meal, one other taco tour sidled up to Rossano’s stand.

There's enough irony going on here to make an aircraft carrier.
 
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