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Immigration and multiculturalism news

Cherico

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Kind of wondering when the tipping point it for all of this shit.

Wont feel that bad when its reached though.
 

DarthOne

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As many as FIFTY children as young as 12 'are found working at Hyundai supplier factory' in Alabama after cops launched search for girl, 13, who ran away with 21-year-old worker


  • The accusations date back to a February Amber Alert regarding Eidy Aracely Tzi Coc, a now 13-year-old, who had briefly disappeared from her family's home
  • Coc, who turns 14 this month, and her two brothers, aged 12 and 15, all worked at the plant earlier this year and weren't going to school
  • Pedro Tzi, Eidy's father, contacted Enterprise police on February 3 after she didn't come home and police issued an amber alert
  • They also launched a manhunt for Cucul, 21, another Guatemalan migrant and SMART worker around that time with whom Tzi believed she might be
  • The girl told officers that Cucul was a friend and that they had traveled there to look for more work. Cucul was arrested and later deported
  • Cucul was arrested and later deported
Migrant children have allegedly been found working at a Hyundai supplier in Alabama after police launched a probe into the disappearance of a 13-year-old girl who ran away with a 21-year-old plant employee.

SMART Alabama in Luverne, an automotive parts manufacturer that has supplied parts for Hyundai since 2003, reportedly fired multiple underage workers - some as young as 12 - as publicity around the missing girl's case heated up.

A former employee alleged that as many as 50 underage workers were employed across various shifts when he was working at the plant.


The accusations date back to a February Amber Alert regarding Eidy Aracely Tzi Coc, who had briefly disappeared from her family's home in the town of Enterprise alongside 21-year-old Alvaro Cucul.

Coc and her two brothers, aged 12 and 15, all worked at the plant earlier this year and weren't going to school, according to people familiar with the situation. Pedro Tzi, Eidy's father, confirmed that his children had worked there in an interview.

Tzi contacted Enterprise police on February 3 after she didn't come home and police issued an amber alert.

They also launched a manhunt for Cucul, another Guatemalan migrant and SMART worker around that time with whom Tzi believed she might be. Using cell phone geolocation data, police located Cucul and the girl in a parking lot in Athens, Georgia the same day she was reported missing.

The girl told officers that Cucul was a friend and that they had traveled the nearly 300-mile journey to look for more work. Cucul was arrested and later deported.

After the disappearance generated local news coverage, SMART allegedly dismissed a number of underage workers, according to two former employees and other locals familiar with the plant. The sources said the police attention raised fears that authorities could soon crack down on other underage workers.

Since then, the plant has faced further accusations of child labor infractions from the police, Coc's family and at least eight former and current employees at the factory.

SMART Alabama LLC, listed by Hyundai in corporate filings as a majority-owned unit, supplies parts for some of the most popular cars and SUVs built by the automaker in Montgomery, its flagship U.S. assembly plant.

Hyundai didn't respond to phone calls or emails from reporters seeking comment.

Tzi's children, who have now enrolled for the upcoming school term, were among a larger cohort of underage workers who found jobs at the Hyundai-owned supplier over the past few years, according to interviews with a dozen former and current plant employees and labor recruiters.

He said he regrets that his children had gone to work. The family needed any income it could get at the time but is now trying to move on.

Tzi added: 'All that is over now. The kids aren't working and in fall they will be in school.'

Several of these minors, authorities said, have ignored schooling in order to work long shifts at the plant, a sprawling facility with a documented history of health and safety violations, including amputation hazards.

Police in Enterprise, about 45 miles from the plant, don't have jurisdiction to investigate possible labor-law violations at the factory. Instead, the force notified the state attorney general's office after the incident, Detective James Sanders said.

Mike Lewis, a spokesperson at the Alabama attorney general's office, declined to comment. It's unclear whether the office or other investigators have contacted SMART or Hyundai about possible violations.

It has not yet been confirmed how many children worked at the factory, what they were paid and what the terms of their employment were.

One former worker at SMART, an adult migrant who left for another auto industry job last year, claimed there were around 50 underage workers between the different plant shifts, adding that he knew some of them personally.

Another former adult worker at SMART, a U.S. citizen who also left the plant last year, alleged she worked alongside about a dozen minors on her shift.

Another former employee, Tabatha Moultry, 39, worked on SMART's assembly line for several years through 2019.

Moultry claimed the plant had high turnover and increasingly relied on migrant workers to keep up with intense production demands. She said she remembered working with one migrant girl who 'looked 11 or 12 years old.'

The girl would come to work with her mother, Moultry said. When Moultry asked her real age, the girl said she was 13.

Moultry added: 'She was way too young to be working in that plant, or any plant'.

David Michaels, for Assistant Secretary of Labor for OSHA, called the allegations an outrage.

Michaels said: '[Consumers] should know that these cars are being built, at least in part, by workers who are children and need to be in school rather than risking life and limb because their families are desperate for income'.


SMART, in a statement, said it follows federal, state and local laws and 'denies any allegation that it knowingly employed anyone who is ineligible for employment.'

The company said it relies on temporary work agencies to fill jobs and expects 'these agencies to follow the law in recruiting, hiring, and placing workers on its premises.'

SMART didn't answer specific questions about the workers cited in this story or on-the-job scenes they and other people familiar with the factory described.

Many of the minors at the plant were hired through recruitment agencies, according to current and former SMART workers and local labor recruiters.

Although staffing firms help fill industrial jobs nationwide, they have often been criticized by labor advocates because they enable large employers to outsource responsibility for checking the eligibility of employees to work.

Alabama and federal laws limit minors under age 18 from working in metal stamping and pressing operations such as SMART, where proximity to dangerous machinery can put them at risk. Alabama law also requires children 17 and under to be enrolled in school.

In late 2020, SMART wrote a letter to U.S. consular officials in Mexico seeking a visa for a Mexican worker. The letter, written by SMART General Manager Gary Sport and reviewed by Reuters, said the plant was 'severely lacking in labor' and that Hyundai 'will not tolerate such shortcomings.'

Earlier this year, attorneys filed a class-action lawsuit against SMART and several staffing firms who help supply workers with U.S. visas. The lawsuit, filed in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Georgia on behalf of a group of about 40 Mexican workers, alleges some employees, hired as engineers, were ordered to work menial jobs instead.

SMART in court documents called allegations in the suit 'baseless' and 'meritless.'
 

WolfBear

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FWIW, this is why exactly I dislike the RAISE Act:


Specifically, because only 2% of present-day adult Americans would actually be capable of passing this test if they themselves were immigrants instead. That strikes me as being WAY too restrictive!

Whatever you want to say about, say, Israel's immigration policy, a solid majority of Israel's population would still be eligible to move there even if they were immigrants instead of already being Israeli citizens.
 

Marduk

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Specifically, because only 2% of present-day adult Americans would actually be capable of passing this test if they themselves were immigrants instead. That strikes me as being WAY too restrictive!

Whatever you want to say about, say, Israel's immigration policy, a solid majority of Israel's population would still be eligible to move there even if they were immigrants instead of already being Israeli citizens.
That says more about civic education standards in these countries than about immigration standards.
 

WolfBear

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That says more about civic education standards in these countries than about immigration standards.
Disagree, because most Americans would not be capable of getting a STEM PhD regardless of anything that they did, for instance. They'd simply lack the necessary intelligence for it.
 

Floridaman

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FWIW, this is why exactly I dislike the RAISE Act:


Specifically, because only 2% of present-day adult Americans would actually be capable of passing this test if they themselves were immigrants instead. That strikes me as being WAY too restrictive!

Whatever you want to say about, say, Israel's immigration policy, a solid majority of Israel's population would still be eligible to move there even if they were immigrants instead of already being Israeli citizens.
just because a lot of Americans are idiots doesn’t mean we should decrease the standards.... actually if anything it means we should tighten it to prevent further damage.
 

Floridaman

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Are 98% of Americans idiots?
i mean considering our current government it doesn’t Seem unreasonable to think the majority are idiots.
edit: if you are going to comment on me fixing spelling, I am using a mobile device, and thus can’t see the screen while typing.
 

WolfBear

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I would say closer to 50%, besides it isn’t like they tested literally everyone, they picked a small sample and claim it represents the entire country.... seriously I took the test before, it isn’t hard assuming you know basic civics it is easy to pass.
I wasn't talking about the US citizenship test here, and neither was this New York Times article. Rather, it was talking about the RAISE Act's points system, as you would know if you and @Marduk would have actually bothered to take a look at this article itself.

You need at least 30 points on the RAISE Act's points system to immigrate to the US if this bill will ever actually pass the US Congress and be signed by the US President. Only 2% of Americans, specifically those in the green parts of the chart above, will actually get the necessary 30+ points for this:



This is all shown in that New York Times article that I linked to above.
 

WolfBear

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I don't have a problem with the US citizenship exam; that exam really is pretty easy to pass if you've studied for it. I'm not complaining about that since both of my parents have already passed it and it wasn't very difficult for them to do after they have sufficiently studied the relevant materials. Rather, my complaint here is about the proposed RAISE Act making it WAY too difficult for people to immigrate to the US since they'd have to be better than 98% of present-day Americans in order for them to ever actually have any chance of getting an immigrant visa. That's extremely unrealistic even for most immigrants from other Western countries!
 

Floridaman

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I wasn't talking about the US citizenship test here, and neither was this New York Times article. Rather, it was talking about the RAISE Act's points system, as you would know if you and @Marduk would have actually bothered to take a look at this article itself.

You need at least 30 points on the RAISE Act's points system to immigrate to the US if this bill will ever actually pass the US Congress and be signed by the US President. Only 2% of Americans, specifically those in the green parts of the chart above, will actually get the necessary 30+ points for this:



This is all shown in that New York Times article that I linked to above.
Again why does that matter, yeah the standards should be increased, think of it as supply and demand. when there is a lot of demand you increase the price..... also if you want to go with Israel’s standards we can do that..... if your relatives are American you can get in otherwise, go away.
 

WolfBear

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Again why does that matter, yeah the standards should be increased, think of it as supply and demand. when there is a lot of demand you increase the price..... also if you want to go with Israel’s standards we can do that..... if your relatives are American you can get in otherwise, go away.
Israel doesn't require you to have existing relatives in the country.
 

Floridaman

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Israel doesn't require you to have existing relatives in the country.
No the rule there is if you have relatives, or are Jewish.... but we are a secular country, so the must be a specific religion doesn’t work. Unless we make Americanism a religion, which could be entertaining.... and would let me punish communists as heretics.
 

WolfBear

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No the rule there is if you have relatives, or are Jewish.... but we are a secular country, so the must be a specific religion doesn’t work. Unless we make Americanism a religion, which could be entertaining.... and would let me punish communists as heretics.
Well, my own preference would be open borders with high-IQ countries and territories (so, the EU, Russia, East Asia, Vietnam) and more selective immigration with low-IQ countries and territories, but one that placed as much focus on IQ testing as on skills in order to give the world's poor but talented a greater chance to come over here. And of course a larger annual intake of immigrants than what we currently have. I wouldn't mind a wall, FWIW, but it's not a high priority since I could understand why exactly people flee Latin American countries (the extremely homicidal situation there).
 

Floridaman

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Well, my own preference would be open borders with high-IQ countries and territories (so, the EU, Russia, East Asia, Vietnam) and more selective immigration with low-IQ countries and territories, but one that placed as much focus on IQ testing as on skills in order to give the world's poor but talented a greater chance to come over here. And of course a larger annual intake of immigrants than what we currently have. I wouldn't mind a wall, FWIW, but it's not a high priority since I could understand why exactly people flee Latin American countries (the extremely homicidal situation there).
that would be a Very toxic idea, the optics of favoring specific ethnic groups and regions like that does would enflame ethnic tensions here, and hurt our diplomacy abroad since it would bring reminders of the Chinese exclusion act. My opinion is depending on conditions it is either hard or easy for anyone to immigrate based on the percent of recent immigrants, like history once we reach a certain point the rules tighten for a generation or two to give us time to assimilate the newcomers. With exceptions given to those who are truly exceptional like those who would meet the standards set above.
 

WolfBear

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that would be a Very toxic idea, the optics of favoring specific ethnic groups and regions like that does would enflame ethnic tensions here, and hurt our diplomacy abroad since it would bring reminders of the Chinese exclusion act. My opinion is depending on conditions it is either hard or easy for anyone to immigrate based on the percent of recent immigrants, like history once we reach a certain point the rules tighten for a generation or two to give us time to assimilate the newcomers. With exceptions given to those who are truly exceptional like those who would meet the standards set above.
How about simply using IQ testing, then? Anyone with a certain IQ or above is eligible to immigrate over here, regardless of their country of origin?
 

TheRomanSlayer

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The only problem with selective immigration from nations with much lower IQ is that the talented and skilled migrant from the lower IQ country that could immigrate to a richer country would contribute to the brain drain of the country the prospective immigrant would come from. While it is also reasonable for people to flee from unstable countries to richer ones, the richer nations should also find the source of the problems the unstable countries are facing, and solve it so that the affected nations could improve long enough to develop it and lessen the desires for emigration from the unstable country.

I'm actually quite opposed to open borders myself, if only because it undermines the concept of what a border is like. Other than that, controlled immigration could also be beneficial in that you'd acquire the talent pool of the affected country and adopt it as your own, but you'd also have tensions between migrants and the natives that inhabit the country. Which is exactly why there's a large tension between the migrants and native Europeans in the European continent.
 
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