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History Native cultures are metal

Lord Sovereign

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Some of the most badass metal weapons ever were ironically not metal at all: Polynesian war clubs!

Polynesians are hardcore. It takes steel to tame the pacific in sodding canoes, be the people of Maui, and bash megafauna (and the occasional British redcoat) to death with War Oars. They are Warm Water Norsemen essentially.

I once heard it said that a specific type of fruit, native to Polynesia, was growing in South America by the time the Conquistadors showed up. I would not be shocked if the Polynesians had trade links to the New World.
 

Zyobot

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Polynesians are hardcore. It takes steel to tame the pacific in sodding canoes, be the people of Maui, and bash megafauna (and the occasional British redcoat) to death with War Oars. They are Warm Water Norsemen essentially.

I once heard it said that a specific type of fruit, native to Polynesia, was growing in South America by the time the Conquistadors showed up. I would not be shocked if the Polynesians had trade links to the New World.
Don’t suppose you recall the name of the fruit in question? Because now you’ve just made me curious, too. :unsure:
 

Lord Sovereign

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Don’t suppose you recall the name of the fruit in question? Because now you’ve just made me curious, too. :unsure:
On further investigation I apologise for getting it the wrong way round, but it seems that the Sweet Potato, native to South America, was exported via trade to the Polynesian islands for cultivation long before Europeans showed up. Now there are some studies that suggest it ended up there naturally, but it is still a theory with some weight as there is evidence of genetic mingling between the Polynesians and the Native Americans: they did make contact with each other at some point.
 

ATP

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My mother tells me that Natives actually learned how to take scalps as a way of keeping score from white folks. Specifically during the French and Indian War because they were paid bounties on how many they killed, and it was a way of having physical proof of killing someone. I have no idea if this is true or just part of some revisionist history, but it does kind of make sense.
As far as i knew,few tribes use it,and other start using when french/english start paing for scalps of their enemies.

Well during WW1 My tribe and others had open season on Germans in the fields of France. It was not good to be a German when my Uncles and cousins came upon them.
Interesting - i remember some movie in which american indians did it during WW1,but always thought,that it was fake.
P.S forget which movie,as usual.

Funny meme, but I really cannot understate just how badly the 7th Cavalry got their cheeks clapped at Little Big Horn. The Indians totally surprised, overwhelmed, and scattered their enemy that day.

And the ones who managed to flee were the lucky ones…

In the British context, we essentially suffered that on steroids at Isandlwana. Except the envelopment was complete, and there was no escape for the 24th Foot...
According to what i read,british had reserve ammo for their rifles - but packed in boxes ,so before they opened them,Zulu was arleady there with their assagais.
If it is true,then somebody responsible for packing ammo killed those soldiers,not Zulu.
I hope,that he get hanged.
 

bintananth

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Interesting - i remember some movie in which american indians did it during WW1,but always thought,that it was fake.
P.S forget which movie,as usual.
Legends of the Fall depicted that. Brad Pitt's character wasn't an American Indian. He played a white guy from Montana serving Canada who did go scapling Germans after his brother was killed.

IIRC his character married the daughter of an American Indian who worked on his father's ranch.
 
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ATP

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Legends of the Fall depicted that. Brad Pitt's character wasn't an American Indian. He played a white guy from Montana serving Canada who did go scapling Germans after his brother was killed.

IIRC his character married the daughter of an American Indian who worked on his father's ranch.
Could be that - i only remember,that some american soldier was killing germans in their trenches and scalping them.
 

bintananth

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Could be that - i only remember,that some american soldier was killing germans in their trenches and scalping them.
When a movie includes scalping it's typically a horror flick meant to shock the audience or set before 1900 in North America ... with the latter ones holding back on the gory details.

Legends of the Fall and Inglorious Basterds are the only ones I can think of set after 1900 which include Europe and aren't horror.
 

ATP

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When a movie includes scalping it's typically a horror flick meant to shock the audience or set before 1900 in North America ... with the latter ones holding back on the gory details.

Legends of the Fall and Inglorious Basterds are the only ones I can think of set after 1900 which include Europe and aren't horror.
I forget to add,that he did it during night attacking sentries,and leave their bodies looking as if they were still alive.
 
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