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Immigration and multiculturalism news

WolfBear

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No. A nation should be ruled by its natural-born citizens, not foreigners.
Our politicians are old communists, to the last. It is natural for them to be morons.
So, you'd deny someone who came to the country as a baby, either as a result of an international adoption or as a result of regular immigration, the opportunity to become your country's leader even though they would have absolutely no memories of their birth country. How thoughtful and compassionate! :(
 

Urabrask Revealed

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So, you'd deny someone who came to the country as a baby, either as a result of an international adoption or as a result of regular immigration, the opportunity to become your country's leader even though they would have absolutely no memories of their birth country. How thoughtful and compassionate! :(
Yes, I would. Compassion is the poison of Leftoids to subvert nations and commit a slow-burn genocide on the local-born and natives.

EDIT: Your reasoning is literally "TOP 10 PICTURES THAT WILL MAKE YOU CRY AND SAY 'HAVING FUCK BORDERS AND LAWS AN' SHEIT!' " You think that garbage will continue to work?
 

TheRomanSlayer

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In my case, while being born in the Middle East to OFW parents may not qualify me for Saudi citizenship in this case, I’d still be disqualified from running for political office in the Philippines, due to me not being born inside Philippine soil. At the same time, as a first generation immigrant, I’d be uncomfortable running for political office in Canada as well, for obvious reasons. If there isn’t any rule against a baby who came to another country as an immigrant and being able to run for the top job, what is stopping me from running for the post of Prime Minister of Canada, or even the President of the Philippines for that matter? There is a good reason why they had that kind of rule in the first place. It sucks, but there is a reason for it.
 

Cherico

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In my case, while being born in the Middle East to OFW parents may not qualify me for Saudi citizenship in this case, I’d still be disqualified from running for political office in the Philippines, due to me not being born inside Philippine soil. At the same time, as a first generation immigrant, I’d be uncomfortable running for political office in Canada as well, for obvious reasons. If there isn’t any rule against a baby who came to another country as an immigrant and being able to run for the top job, what is stopping me from running for the post of Prime Minister of Canada, or even the President of the Philippines for that matter? There is a good reason why they had that kind of rule in the first place. It sucks, but there is a reason for it.
to be fair you would probally run canada better then the current guy.
 

TheRomanSlayer

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to be fair you would probally run canada better then the current guy.
Yeah, but I’d probably get the Obama flak from the more hardcore right wingers though. I’d actually fit in well as a Zhirinovsky like figure in Canadian politics though. Too hot tempered.

Also, one other question: if for example, a Jewish politician wants to become Prime Minister of Israel, does he or she have to be born in Israeli soil though, or not? It’s also complicated by the Law of Return forany Jew that wants to make Aliyah to Israel from anywhere in the world.
 

WolfBear

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Yeah, but I’d probably get the Obama flak from the more hardcore right wingers though. I’d actually fit in well as a Zhirinovsky like figure in Canadian politics though. Too hot tempered.

Also, one other question: if for example, a Jewish politician wants to become Prime Minister of Israel, does he or she have to be born in Israeli soil though, or not? It’s also complicated by the Law of Return forany Jew that wants to make Aliyah to Israel from anywhere in the world.
AFAIK, neither Israel nor Canada actually have a natural-born citizen requirement for holding office. Israel also does not legally require its politicians, including its national leaders, to actually be Jewish.
 

Aldarion

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So, you'd deny someone who came to the country as a baby, either as a result of an international adoption or as a result of regular immigration, the opportunity to become your country's leader even though they would have absolutely no memories of their birth country. How thoughtful and compassionate! :(
Compassion gets you killed. Just look at the West. And it is also the weapon that Left uses to destroy, well, everything.

Basing policies on the concept of compassion is literally the worst thing a country can do.

So yeah.
 
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The Whispering Monk

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How thoughtful and compassionate!
The moment this is your argument, you lose. Thoughtful and compassionate are not the reasons laws are made.

I completely agree that every law should undergo rigorous examination as to its consequences, and that they should not be made to cause harm. Emotion is the enemy of rigorous debate.

As for the law in question, it does no harm.
 

DarthOne

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BREAKING: Supreme Court rules noncitizens not entitled to bond hearings


On Monday, the United States Supreme Court ruled that unlawful migrants to the United States are not entitled to a bond hearing. The opinion stems from the migration of Antonio Arteaga-Martinez.

Arteaga-Martinez, a Mexican Citizen, came to the United States unlawfully on four occasions without inspection until May 2018, when Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) issued a warrant for Arteaga-Martinez’s arrest after he had been living and working in the United States for almost six years. ICE’s detention of Arteaga-Martinez did not come with the opportunity for a bond hearing and he was set to be removed from the United States.

Arteaga-Martinez's attorney appealed in an attempt to stop his removal from the United States, citing his fear of prosecution or torture in Mexico. The DHS Asylum Officer who heard Martinez’s testimony found it to be reasonable and credible and referred Arteaga-Martinez to an immigration judge.

Arteaga-Martinez would remain in detention absent a ruling by an immigration judge, so, by his attorney, Arteaga-Martinez asked the U.S District Court for the Middle District of Pennsylvania to bring him before the court in what is known as a “Writ of Habeas Corpus” petition. This petition pivoted from the claims of fears of prosecution and instead argued his continued detention without a bond hearing was violative of his Federal Statutory Law and Constitutional rights.

In a bond hearing, the Government would be expected to establish by clear and convincing evidence that a non-citizen, such as Arteaga-Martinez, either poses a risk of flight or a danger to the community. An Immigration Judge presided over Arteaga-Martinez’s bond hearing, finding under Federal Law that he was entitled to release, and Arteaga-Martinez posted bond. The immigration judge, even today, has not ruled on whether to remove Arteaga-Martinez from the United States.

The opinion written by Sotomayor reverses the judgment of the lower courts and finds that the process provided by ICE provides sufficient procedural protections for non-citizens, and that Arteaga-Martinez was not entitled to a bond hearing before an immigration judge. The Supreme Court declined to address Arteaga-Martinez’s constitutional claims.

The decision comes on the heels of a string of controversies surrounding the continued existence of ICE and a concerted effort to grant illegal immigrants the same procedural and Constitutional rights as American citizens. In May, the Biden administration appointed a radical activist who wants to "abolish ICE" as an immigration judge.

Cases involving the detention of unlawful migrants from Mexico are increasing as the number of border crossings continue to rise. Between April 1st and the second week of May, over half a million migrants crossed the US border in just 10 weeks.

The Supreme Court rulings this week are under close watch, as many wait for the anticipated overturn of Roe v. Wade following a leaked draft of the decision in May.
Dear Illegal Aliens....
 

Marduk

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No. A nation should be ruled by its natural-born citizens, not foreigners.
So, you'd deny someone who came to the country as a baby, either as a result of an international adoption or as a result of regular immigration, the opportunity to become your country's leader even though they would have absolutely no memories of their birth country. How thoughtful and compassionate! :(
A country should be ruled by people who are members of its nation by culture and allegiance.
The "natural born citizen" requirement kinda sorta worked to do that... in the context of XIX century and earlier.
Now it is a joke, when combined with birthright citizenship and cheaper, safer travel than ever in history.
For example, a CCP official's wife can fly in from China to USA for a month long vacation just when it so happens that she is pregnant, have a natural born US citizen CCP princeling child there, and return to China with that child for the next 20 years to be raised and educated among the elite of CCP.
There is absolutely no particular reason why that child should be a loyal US citizen, or have much in common with the average US national at all, yet that doesn't take away the legal privileges that go with the natural born citizen status.
Similar problems to one or another degree can arise with ethnocultural ghettos and other tight knit yet highly foreign, not really assimilating communities.

The lack of combining with birthright citizenship is also the explanation for even the more nationalist of Europe's countries not having that specified, as it is (or in some cases was until very recently) very unlikely for a questionable case to be given citizenship anyway.


If you compare the maps, you can see that the correlation between these policies is extremely high.
 

Agent23

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A country should be ruled by people who are members of its nation by culture and allegiance.
The "natural born citizen" requirement kinda sorta worked to do that... in the context of XIX century and earlier.
Now it is a joke, when combined with birthright citizenship and cheaper, safer travel than ever in history.
For example, a CCP official's wife can fly in from China to USA for a month long vacation just when it so happens that she is pregnant, have a natural born US citizen CCP princeling child there, and return to China with that child for the next 20 years to be raised and educated among the elite of CCP.
There is absolutely no particular reason why that child should be a loyal US citizen, or have much in common with the average US national at all, yet that doesn't take away the legal privileges that go with the natural born citizen status.
Similar problems to one or another degree can arise with ethnocultural ghettos and other tight knit yet highly foreign, not really assimilating communities.

The lack of combining with birthright citizenship is also the explanation for even the more nationalist of Europe's countries not having that specified, as it is (or in some cases was until very recently) very unlikely for a questionable case to be given citizenship anyway.


If you compare the maps, you can see that the correlation between these policies is extremely high.
Even minimal citizenship rights should be granted only if somebody is:
1) Born in a particular country or has been a long-time legal resident.
2) Language fluency and cultural assimilation.
3) And most importantly being a net taxpayer for a period of time.

I would like to have a system of the "service guarantees citizenship" variety, but I doubt I will be able to swing it.
Also, immigrants should have access to some forms of welfare curtailed and pay an additional tax for being let in.
Bulgaria for example gives anyone who finishes an university here citizenship status, which is kinda absurd, I mean I am ok with doing that for some specific professions if they stick around and don't just use it for a springboard into the EU. :sick:
 

Agent23

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Oh, and most importantly of all, welfare access and voting rights should be suspended if somebody has not been a resident or hasn't paid taxes.
Romania, IIRC levies a small tax on all its residents, even those that are abroad.
Frankly, if you can't cough up a few percent of the paycheck for the Motherland every month you obviously don't care enough about it to be allowed to vote!
 
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