• Attention All Comstar Customers, Due to unexpected interference by suspected Word of Blake operatives, the HPG systems update was *not* successful. No data was lost due to our careful and extensive backups; however, we will need to try again next weekend. Sincerely, Comstar Precentor Dune

Klaus Schwab and the World Economic Forum

Bacle

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Hasn't it been proven that bugs don't make a good meat replacement for humans? Due to components being inedible or causing digestive issues for humans or not providing proper nutrients?

Just... feed the bugs to chickens or something.
There are real issues with some grubs being poisonous, which was a real concern for our ancestors, and yes, humans learned feeding grubs to larger animals was a better way to get nutritional value out of them. It is better to feed them to other animals, as you pointed out, and humans realized many other animals naturally ate the grubs themselves, and those animals taste better too.

However there is an argument about bugs as a 'meat substitute' for long term space travel/habitation, where things with rigid bones could have issues with zero gravity. You can grow bugs big in zero-G, and grow some fish that way as well, and when every pound matters, bugs and fish for 'fresh meat' may be the only way to have a continuous supply of some type of self-replicating protein.
 

Bear Ribs

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Hasn't it been proven that bugs don't make a good meat replacement for humans? Due to components being inedible or causing digestive issues for humans or not providing proper nutrients?

Just... feed the bugs to chickens or something.
Yes, most insects are unable to process B Vitamins and contain only micro-amounts of them. A kilo of mealworms a day has about enough B-Vitamins to sustain... a rat. And they're probably not keen on you eating a full two pounds of the bugs either. Calcium is also notoriously low, and even the nutrition that supposedly is in the bugs is often not digestible to humans because it's packed in the chitin, which will go right through you without releasing that precious protein.


B-Vitamins in general tend to be the sticking point for most of these diets. Vegans tend notoriously towards B-Vitamin deficiency diseases because the only real sources of B-Vitamins are eggs, meat, yogurt, and a few other animal sources. There are plants that have some but you have to be a ruminant to eat enough of them to matter. Calcium has the same issue. Coincidentally B-Vitamins and Calcium are ridiculously heavily required for developing brains. They talk about calcium for bones but the reason our body uses calcium bones is to have a reserve for the brain, you body will strip calcium from the skeleton as needed to keep the brain going. This is also why lead causes brain damage, it happens to chemically be able to replace calcium in the specific receptors the brain uses for its calcium fix, and will thus block brain development if ingested at a young age.

The uptake of this is that feeding bugs to kids specifically is an almost tailor-made recipe for low intelligence in the next generation.
 

Bacle

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If chickens can't handle it, we can't either. Spin the habitat or just accept it and don't return to the bottom of a gravity well where your skeleton will implode.
No, it's more that with bugs and fish you could potentially grow them in zero-G sections of ships/habitats, instead of needing to spin them as well, which saves on thrust mass/wear/tear on the spinning sections.
 

Urabrask Revealed

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WEF agenda in full force: Hundreds of schools in The Netherlands have started a campaign introducing 10-12 y/o kids to mealworms & insects as a ‘sustainable’ meat substitute. The goal is to bring about “behavioral changes through unprejudiced children”
Everyone involved in this should be doxxed and stripped of any protection.
 

TheRomanSlayer

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It’s also designed to physically weaken the next generation to the point where they can’t fight back against the globalists. One needs to compare between the previous generations and the current ones in terms of physical development. Our parents and grandparents were a lot stronger in their youths, and with each generation, it becomes weaker.

If we’re also mentioning the development of human bodies to tailor for space habitation, there’s also the fact that our movement in lessened gravity might be vastly different from regular gravity.
 

LordsFire

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It’s also designed to physically weaken the next generation to the point where they can’t fight back against the globalists. One needs to compare between the previous generations and the current ones in terms of physical development. Our parents and grandparents were a lot stronger in their youths, and with each generation, it becomes weaker.

If we’re also mentioning the development of human bodies to tailor for space habitation, there’s also the fact that our movement in lessened gravity might be vastly different from regular gravity.
I dunno about you, but I'm quite a bit bigger and beefier than my dad. He'd wreck me on cardio, but I'm within an inch of my grandfathers and have equal or greater muscle mass.

Of course, I'm a middle-of-the-pack millennial. I wouldn't necessarily expect the same from late millennials or zoomers.
 

Flintsteel

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No, it's more that with bugs and fish you could potentially grow them in zero-G sections of ships/habitats, instead of needing to spin them as well, which saves on thrust mass/wear/tear on the spinning sections.
You'd be better off with one of the high-protein algae. Especially since they have a better amino acid balance, and higher bio-availability than bugs. Seriously, there is no reason a technological civilization like ours should be pushing eating bugs.
 

Wargamer08

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You'd be better off with one of the high-protein algae. Especially since they have a better amino acid balance, and higher bio-availability than bugs. Seriously, there is no reason a technological civilization like ours should be pushing eating bugs.
I've long grown to realize that it's nothing more then the most bitter childish spite, brought forward. They push for it because their enemies hate it, because it might hurt industries that their enemies enjoy.
 

Bear Ribs

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You'd be better off with one of the high-protein algae. Especially since they have a better amino acid balance, and higher bio-availability than bugs. Seriously, there is no reason a technological civilization like ours should be pushing eating bugs.
They've already got that covered. They're aiming at Bugs have less protein and nutrition, and that's a good thing:

 

Bacle

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You'd be better off with one of the high-protein algae. Especially since they have a better amino acid balance, and higher bio-availability than bugs. Seriously, there is no reason a technological civilization like ours should be pushing eating bugs.
Oh, I agree; I just wanted to point out the case for edible bugs in relation to space travel and weight savings.

Personally I think we'd be better off trying to figure out how to raise and rear goats in space; they can give you meat, milk, cheese, clothing/fab material (goat hair as 3-D printer feedstock, for example), and are pretty easy to handle living area wise.

Even goat bones could be recycled as fertilizer.
 

Bear Ribs

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Oh, I agree; I just wanted to point out the case for edible bugs in relation to space travel and weight savings.

Personally I think we'd be better off trying to figure out how to raise and rear goats in space; they can give you meat, milk, cheese, clothing/fab material (goat hair as 3-D printer feedstock, for example), and are pretty easy to handle living area wise.

Even goat bones could be recycled as fertilizer.
Soon...

Steely Eyed Missile Man: Alright, the goats we sent up ate the flight computer so we're going to have to figure out how to get that rocket to land on manual.
 

Cherico

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Oh, I agree; I just wanted to point out the case for edible bugs in relation to space travel and weight savings.

Personally I think we'd be better off trying to figure out how to raise and rear goats in space; they can give you meat, milk, cheese, clothing/fab material (goat hair as 3-D printer feedstock, for example), and are pretty easy to handle living area wise.

Even goat bones could be recycled as fertilizer.
Space travel is going to be one of those things where a lot of trial and error is going to be needed.

Were going to have to figure out how to make that work for us the hard way.
 

DarthOne

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Australian Bank Begins Linking Customer Transactions to Carbon Footprint


In another foretaste of potential future ‘carbon allowance’ limits, a major bank in Australia has introduced a new feature that links purchases to a customer’s carbon footprint and warns them when they are going over the average.

Australia’s Commonwealth Bank (CBA) has partnered with Cogo, a “carbon management solutions” company, to launch the new feature, which is part of CBA’s online banking platform.

The bank gives the customer the option to “pay a fee” to offset their carbon footprint, with the average listed as 1,280 kilograms, a long way from the ‘sustainable’ figure of 200 kilograms.



A person’s carbon footprint is calculated and then an ‘equivalent’ metric is show to make the customer feel guilty about it, such as “8 trees being cut”.

“By combining our rich customer data and CoGo’s industry-leading capability in measuring carbon outputs, we will be able to provide greater transparency for customers so that they can take actionable steps to reduce their environmental footprint,” CommBank Group executive Angus Sullivan said in a statement.

The bank has promised to refine the calculation down to showing how much CO2 individual purchases are responsible for.



While initially presented as a handy way for someone to track their consumption habits and the supposed impact they have on the environment, some fear that such schemes could one day become mandatory and place limits on purchases of customers who exceed their ‘carbon allowance.’

As we previously highlighted, allied with climate lockdowns, technocrats want to exploit hysteria over climate change to increase financial control over individuals.

Such a proposal was presented in the science journal Nature by four environmental “experts” as a means of reducing global carbon emissions.

Everyone would be issued with a ‘carbon allowance card’ “that would entail all adults receiving an equal tradable carbon allowance that reduces over time in line with national [carbon] targets.”

The authors make it clear that the program would be a “national mandatory policy.”

Carbon units would be “deducted from the personal budget with every payment of transport fuel, home-heating fuels and electricity bills,” and anyone going over the limit would be forced to purchase additional units in the personal carbon market from those with excess to sell.”

Of course, the wealthy would be easily able to afford the offsets, and many of them are directly invested in the trading mechanisms that the scheme would be based on.


The proposal makes clear that the means of measuring a person’s uptake of carbon units for travel would function “on the basis of the tracking the user’s movement history.”

The authors note that mass compliance with COVID-19 lockdown regulations has greased the skids for further intrusive tyranny and that, “people may be more prepared to accept the tracking and limitations related to PCAs to achieve a safer climate” as a result.
 
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